London Coin Gallery Commemorative Collection

Commemorative coins that celebrate and honor American people,  places, events, and institutions.  Although these coins are legal tender, they are not minted for general circulation.  Each commemorative coin is produced by the United States Mint in limited quantity and is only available for a limited time. As well as commemorating important aspects of American history and culture, these coins help raise money for important causes.  

 

London Coin Gallery Commemorative

US MintCommemorative Coins made by the US Mint began in 1892, then flourished during the 1920s and 1930s. The US Bicentennial in 1976 ushered in a new era of commemorative coinage that continues to expand in depth and quality to the present year.

Quarters including StateUntil the arrival of the State Quarters in 1999 there were only two commemorative quarters: the Queen Isabella quarter of 1893, and the Bicentennial quarter of 1976. The State Quarters program mandated five different quarters per year, state by state, from 1999 through 2008. In 2009 quarters were struck for the District of Columbia and the five US Territories. The National Parks Quarters, also known as The America The Beautiful Series, began in 2010 and continues to this day.

Half DollarsCommemorative Half Dollars were the predominant US collector coin produced through most of the 20th century. Notable examples include the Columbian Exposition coins of 1892 and 1893, the Panama-Pacific half dollar of 1915, and the Oregon Trail Memorial coin of 1926-1939.

DollarsDollar Commemoratives have been made off and on since the 1900 Lafayette Dollar of 1900. Several gold commemorative dollars were produced shortly thereafter: the 1903 Louisiana Purchase Exposition coin, the Lewis and Clark dollars of 1904-1905, a Panama-Pacific gold dollar in 1915, the 1916-1917 McKinley Memorial coins, and the Grant Memorial gold dollar of 1922.  Since 1983 a great number of silver dollar commemoratives have been produced, beginning with the 1983-1984 Los Angeles Olympic coins.

Military (Marine & Army)Commemorative coins with military themes include the half dollars for the Lexington-Concord Sesquicentennial (1925), the Stone Mountain Memorial (1925, the Battle of Gettysburg Anniversary (1936), and the Battle of Antietam Anniversary (1937.) In later years the Korean War Memorial silver dollar, the USO silver dollar, and the 50th Anniversary of WWII coins (all 1991) are standout examples.

Boys Scouts The Boy Scouts of America Centennial (2010) silver dollar was struck as both a proof coin and a business strike. The obverse side depicts three saluting scouts with the familiar trefoil on the reverse.

Girls ScoutsThe Girl Scouts of the USA Centennial (2013) silver dollar features three smiling faces on the obverse and a more abstract rendition on the reverse. A popular coin struck as a proof and as a business strike.

Challenge CoinsChallenge coins have been produced over the years for military units, law enforcement, and first responders, among others. They are large in size, often 44 millimeters or more.Challenge coins result in a free drink if the challenged individual fails to match the challenger’s coin at the bar.

Presidential Dollars - Challenge coins have been produced over the years for military units, law enforcement, and first responders, among others. They are large in size, often 44 millimeters or more.Challenge coins result in a free drink if the challenged individual fails to match the challenger’s coin at the bar.